from-kandyland-to-kettlebells:

wanner16:

akaitsume:

Me flirting with someone I’m not emotionally invested in:

image

Me flirting with someone I actually like:

image

I identify with this…

This is so me!

(via ibringmotivation)


lifeinmotion84:

Camping is Better with Dogs

(via amandajuliette)


sippingonpussyjuice:

anikamoa05:

aries: bro ho

taurus: realest ho

gemini:  fake ho

cancer: sensitive ho

leo: cool ho

virgo: bitch ho

libra: smart ass ho

scorpio: best ho

sagittarius: chill ho

capricorn: bitter ho

aquarius:  crazy ho

pisces:  magical ho

why are these so real

(via felixdawkins)


The Things You Let Me Keep (2014)

(via letmecomehome)



xaannaax:

bookiesbooty:

It’s back.

This is my favorite video of all time

(via felixdawkins)



(via strange-vine)


fitandhealthyhero:

Even though the price of food is rising, eating healthily while sticking to a budget is not impossible. With a little bit of planning and some useful tips, buying and preparing delicious, healthy food on a budget can be done!
Here’s a huge map/guide on eating healthy and cheap. 
You can honestly eat very cheaply, and healthy if you make your own foods. It’s okay if you’re not completely 100% healthy due to your income, (I know that feeling, being a Uni student and all) but making your own food allows you to learn to cook on your own, experiment with flavour and get a full understanding of the nutritional value of each meal. 
Here’s a list of healthy and inexpensive meals: 
Breakfast:
A serve of cereal is quarter a cup of muesli, 2/3 cup of breakfast flakes or 1/2 cup cooked porridge – or roughly 30g:
Rolled oats per 30g = 0.15c
Corn flakes per 30g = 0.40c
Breakfast bar per 30g = 0.60c
Recipes: 
Flourless Apple Pie Pancakes
Overnight Oats
Chocolate Overnight Oats with Berries
Lunch:
Chickpea Salad
Baked Sweet Potato Chips
Creamy Chicken Curry
Lemon Sole
Fried Tuna Patties
Eggs in a Bread Bowl
Dinner:
Chicken serving facts:
A serve of chicken is 100g (raw):
Frozen whole chicken per 100g = 0.40c
Raw whole chicken per 100g = 0.40c
BBQ chicken per 100g = 0.55c
Pre-made chicken kebabs per 100g = $1.40
Recipes: 
Red Lentil and Quinoa Soup
Easy Fried Rice
Spaghetti, Zucchini, and Meatballs
Seafood Paella
One Pot Chicken and Rice Bowl
Roast Chicken, Potatoes, Green Beans
Peanut Soup
Planning is the secret to healthy eating while sticking to a budget, it’s really not as hard as it seems!
Plan out your meals for the week. This will allow you to think ahead and calculate the cost of each meal/day and see how it fits into your budget. 
Make a shopping list and stick to it. It will also help if you don’t go shopping for food while hungry!
Think hard about why you are buying discretionary foods and how much you really need to buy. This is especially important if you are trying to lose weight, because if you don’t buy it and take it home, it’s much easier to stick to your goals.
Drink water. Don’t spend your money on juice or other sweetened drinks, water is pretty much free if you are able to drink it from a tap, and it has no calories. It’s also fairly cheap, too, if you buy it in bulk. 
Freeze leftovers for other meals or for lunches. Also, use leftovers in different ways.
Buy smaller amounts of lean meat, skinless chicken and fish and extend meals by adding legumes, extra vegetables and grains. By adding extra vegetables to meat dishes, you will also reduce the kilojoules in the dish.
Only buy what you need.

fitandhealthyhero:

Even though the price of food is rising, eating healthily while sticking to a budget is not impossible. With a little bit of planning and some useful tips, buying and preparing delicious, healthy food on a budget can be done!

Here’s a huge map/guide on eating healthy and cheap. 

You can honestly eat very cheaply, and healthy if you make your own foods. It’s okay if you’re not completely 100% healthy due to your income, (I know that feeling, being a Uni student and all) but making your own food allows you to learn to cook on your own, experiment with flavour and get a full understanding of the nutritional value of each meal. 

Here’s a list of healthy and inexpensive meals: 

Breakfast:

A serve of cereal is quarter a cup of muesli, 2/3 cup of breakfast flakes or 1/2 cup cooked porridge – or roughly 30g:

  • Rolled oats per 30g = 0.15c
  • Corn flakes per 30g = 0.40c
  • Breakfast bar per 30g = 0.60c

Recipes: 

Lunch:

Dinner:

Chicken serving facts:

A serve of chicken is 100g (raw):

  • Frozen whole chicken per 100g = 0.40c
  • Raw whole chicken per 100g = 0.40c
  • BBQ chicken per 100g = 0.55c
  • Pre-made chicken kebabs per 100g = $1.40

Recipes: 

Planning is the secret to healthy eating while sticking to a budget, it’s really not as hard as it seems!

  • Plan out your meals for the week. This will allow you to think ahead and calculate the cost of each meal/day and see how it fits into your budget. 
  • Make a shopping list and stick to it. It will also help if you don’t go shopping for food while hungry!
  • Think hard about why you are buying discretionary foods and how much you really need to buy. This is especially important if you are trying to lose weight, because if you don’t buy it and take it home, it’s much easier to stick to your goals.
  • Drink water. Don’t spend your money on juice or other sweetened drinks, water is pretty much free if you are able to drink it from a tap, and it has no calories. It’s also fairly cheap, too, if you buy it in bulk. 
  • Freeze leftovers for other meals or for lunches. Also, use leftovers in different ways.
  • Buy smaller amounts of lean meat, skinless chicken and fish and extend meals by adding legumes, extra vegetables and grains. By adding extra vegetables to meat dishes, you will also reduce the kilojoules in the dish.
  • Only buy what you need.